MAP Gas

extends shelf-life by 50-500%

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Packaging in a protective atmosphere has never been more relevant, given the attention on plastics and food waste. Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) has its place in the debate for its ability to reduce food waste. MAP is an established technology proven to significantly slow the process of decay and extend the shelf life of packaged foods, naturally and without preservatives. It works by replacing atmospheric air with carbon dioxide, nitrogen or oxygen, either on their own or in combination, depending on the product.

Extended shelf life

Extended shelf life

Reach wider markets and minimise food waste

Looks matter

Looks matter

Maintain the quality look of your products

All natural gases

All natural gases

Minimise the need for preservatives with gas derived from the air that we breathe


Gold standard MAP handbook


For your free copy of our industry gold standard MAP handbook, please call 0800 389 0202 or click here

How your product could benefit from gas flushing

Packaging in a protective atmosphere is able to extend the shelf life of your food products by up to 500%. Discover how much longer a shelf life you could achieve by gas flushing.
Prepared ready meals

Prepared ready meals

Shelf life up to 10 days

compared to up to 5 days in air

Raw red meat

Raw red meat

Shelf life up to 8 days

compared to up to 4 days in air

Fish and Seafood

Raw Fish and Seafood

Shelf life up to 6 days

compared to up to 4 days in air

Poultry

Raw Poultry

Shelf life up to 21 days

compared to up to 7 days in air

Breads & pastries

Breads & pastries

Shelf life up to 12 weeks

compared to up to 14 days in air
Prepared fruit and bagged salads

Prepared fruit and salads

Shelf life up to 10 days

compared to up to 5 days in air

Nuts, seeds and snacks

Nuts, seeds and snacks

Shelf life up to 2 years

compared to up to 8 months air

Cheese

Cheese

Shelf life up to 12 weeks

compared to up to 4 weeks in air

Click here for more information about specific gas mixes

How tackling food waste doesn't have to cost the earth

Save Money

More than a billion tonnes of food never gets eaten each year amounting to over $940 billion in economic losses annually, reports Craig Hanson (Global Director of Food, Forests, and Water at WRI) and Peter Mitchell (Head of Economics, WRAP) in their publication, The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste.

The issue of food waste has been catapulted to the fore in recent years, and what was seen in the past as 'part of the cost of doing business' is now being examined at every point in the supply chain to help to minimise food losses and improve profitability margins.

The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste reports that food companies that are actively invested in food loss and waste reduction, are recognising up to 1,300 per cent return on their investment. Food manufacturers are making the following changes to their businesses to realise financial benefits:

Outside of the economic wins, other less tangible benefits can be realised too. These relate to food security, waste regulations, environmental sustainability, stakeholder relationships, and a sense of ethical responsibility. One way of tackling waste is through the element of packaging, designed to keep food fresher for longer and our MAP gases can help.

Proud members of

Campden BRI

PPMA

Why do I need Oxygen in my Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) gas mix when packing red meat but not poultry?

Neil Hansford, UK & IE Freshline Applications Product Line Manager answers this frequently asked question:


"The answer is simple: using oxygen helps to retain the appetising colour of red meat".
The colour of fresh red meat is largely determined by the protein myoglobin, which is present in the tissue. Myoglobin itself is purple, but can react with oxygen to create two other pigmented forms, oxymyoglobin, which is red, and the brown metmyoglobin.

In air, the concentration of oxygen is at a level that favours the formation of metmyoglobin, turning the meat brown, which consumers can find unattractive. However, under much higher concentrations of oxygen, the deep red oxymyoglobin is more likely to be produced. So, with the appropriate MAP mixture – typically between 60 and 80 per cent oxygen – fresh red meat will retain its appetising colour.

Although myoglobin is present in both red and white meat, white meat animals are 'fast twitch', needing quick bursts of energy and they get this energy from glycogen which is stored in the muscles.  This results in less myoglobin presenting in the tissue which is why oxygen is not needed in the MAP gas mix.  Red meat animals are 'slow twitch' which means they have muscles designed for long periods of activity such as grazing.  This results in myoglobin that stores oxygen in the muscle cells.  The more myoglobin, the redder or darker the meat and the more potential there is for metmyoglobin to form, giving the meat an unappetising brown colour.  So, that's why oxygen is added to the MAP gas mix for red meats, but not poultry."

Watch our short video to discover how MAP works to extend shelf life

Want to know more?

To discuss how we can help optimise your food process please call 0800 389 0202, fill out the form, email apukinfo@airproducts.com or sign up to our newsletter for our latest updates here.


Contact us

Call 0800 389 0202 or fill out the form below
to book a free process assessment or to receive the Gold standard MAP handbook.


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